Speakers

Sherief Gaber, activist

(c) Sherif GaberSherif Gaber

“The liberation and transformation of quotidian, everyday spaces has been one of the paramount features of the Egyptian revolution; any media that would claim to be revolutionary must engage with and take place within these spaces. Our challenge is to take media from being an object of individual consumption to becoming a tactic for producing new environments and collectivities.”

Sherief Gaber was born to Egyptian parents in 1984 in Boston and grew up in Memphis, Tennessee. He studied urban planning and law in Austin, Texas, and was particularly interested in social housing and communal development.

During his childhood and early youth, Gaber travelled to Egypt regularly. When the revolution started he returned to Cairo and joined Mosireen, a non-profit media collective that has documented the protests and the violations of social justice. Mosireen had been nominated for Reporters without Borders’ 2013 Netizen Prize.

As well as working as an activist, he is also currently looking at communal and informal urban planning, the right to a city and the development of public spaces.

Related links

Fikrun wa fann: Media

Fikrun wa Fann, the Goethe-Institut’s cultural magazine. Articles of the issue on media.

Humboldt: Protest 2.0 “Time for Revollusion”

An arts journal intended to nurture cultural exchange between Germany and Latin America, Spain and Portugal, also available as e-paper.

100 voices

One hundred video interviews about change in the Arab World

Going Public – On the Possibility of a Public Statement

Public art in Lithuania, Belarus, Kaliningrad and Germany

Dossier: Civil Society

Aktion des Projekts “Zwanzig-Forint-Operette”/ A „Húszforintos opera“ projekt akciója. Copyright: Fekete Hajnal
What characterises German civil society with its long-standing traditions and the strong re-emergence of Hungarian civil society? An overview.