Boom. Boom. Boom.

Boom. Boom. Boom.

When the Wall came down, people streamed from the eastern part of the city across to the western bit. The colourful products of the western world of consumption went in the opposite direction. Soon, there was artificial green turf in front of the kiosks. Advertisements for the cigarette brand West whirled in the wind. White plastic chairs, which globalisation had already taken to all corners of the western world, now stood on the footpaths of the eastern part of the city.

It was not just colourful things which found their way east. The new age was soon accompanied by a new kind of music: the electronic sounds and hard beats of techno pounded from car radios, dictating its rhythm to the dancers in the city’s clubs. Soon after the opening of the Wall young people from the entire western hemisphere trickled into the centre of the former capital of the GDR to celebrate the enormous new potential of opportunities, the vast scope of a future together with East German ravers. This party took place every day at many different locations and never seemed to end.

In 1990, the wilderness stretched out north of Checkpoint Charlie. The Friedrichstrasse was located in an almost deserted zone, in a zone that ranked way down in the hierarchy of town planning of the capital of the GDR. The area of the former government quarter was characterised by its surrounding silence. Many of the old buildings seemed empty. Between them yawned bomb craters. Wild flowers blossomed in the middle of the city. Anyone coming from the south and turning left onto Leipziger Street soon reached the large empty space of Potsdamer Platz. What at one time was Europe’s most congested square had turned into a steppe landscape.

During the day silence prevailed, soon broken, however, at night with festive activities. People travelled by cycle over the empty square looking for the entrance to the WMF Club. For a few weeks, the club was located in a former toilet facility of the city railway. One climbed down through a hole into the white-tiled club, drank beer directly from the bottle and danced. It was the second WMF; the club got its name from the occupied building of the Württembergischen Metallwaren Fabrik (Wuerttemberg Metalwork Factory), in whose basement it had been established. The corner house with the old WMF logo was at the corner of Mauer and Leipziger Street.