Eluned Gramich

Copyright: Eluned Gramich
Copyright: Eluned Gramich

Born in Haverfordwest, Wales, Eluned studied English at Oxford and has an MA in Creative Writing from UEA. She won the inaugural New Welsh Writing Award (2015) with a memoir, Woman Who Brings the Rain, based on her time in Japan which went on to be short-listed for Wales Book of the Year 2016. She was also short-listed for the Bristol Short Story Prize, and has been published in various anthologies and magazines including New Welsh Short Stories, Stand, Rarebit: New Welsh Fiction, World Literature Online and Notes on the Underground. Since 2012, she has worked as a freelance translator from German to English.

The commissioned translation of Goldfish Memory by Deutscher Buchpreis selected author Monique Schwitter was published in 2015 by Parthian. In Welsh, she has written two essays for literary magazines Taliesin and O'r Pedwar Gwynt. 

She has just finished her first novel, and is currently living in Cardiff, Wales, where she writes and translates full time.

Selection of translated titles:

Monique Schwitter, Goldfish Memory (Goldfischgedächtnis). Parthian Books, 2015.

Three questions to Eluned Gramich:

Why did you choose to become a translator? Is it the profession you always wanted?
I chose to become a translator because of my love of literature - especially German literature - as I want as many people as possible to be able to read German authors! I believe translation opens our eyes to the world, and lets us know that our particular culture and society may not be the only way of living life. At heart, translation, like reading, is about empathy and understanding, and this is why it is so worthwhile. It's closely related to creative writing, which is also something I love to do.

Which German book do you like the best and why?
This is an impossible question! I love Monique Schwitter's work, of course, and her latest novel Eins im Andern was shortlisted for the Deutscher Buchpreis 2015. One of my favourite writers "of all time" is Joseph Roth. The Radetzky March is one of those books you read as a teenager that change your view of the world forever. 


Is there a particular book you would like to translate?
Yes, I'd love to translate Ilse Tielsch's Fremder Strand. I've been reading a few Ilse Tielsch works from the 80s and 90s and I think she is a very poetic, understated and serene writer.

    British Centre for Literary Translation

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    Emerging Translators' Network

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    German Translators' Workshop

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