Peggy Mädler

Legende vom Glück des Menschen

© Verlag Galiani Berlin, Berlin, 2011 Peggy Mädler: Legende vom Glück des Menschen © Verlag Galiani Berlin, Berlin, 2011 Happiness? Or its little sister, contentment? What counts in life? Is contentment even possible in view of the fact that two wars are inscribed into the lives of even the younger generations through the memories of their parents and grandparents? Peggy Mädler’s debut novel circles around these questions. In her book Legende vom Glück des Menschen, the writer, who was born in Dresden in 1976, also plumbs the possibilities and limits of human memory. Not only the two world wars, but also the German-German past serve her as a foil.
While clearing out her grandmother’s flat after her death, Mädler’s protagonist, Ina Endes, discovers a coffee table book published in 1968 entitled Vom Glück des Menschen. Its editors include Karl-Eduard von Schnitzler. As chief commentator on East German television, he was a political journalist who was as well-known as he was disputed. As she leafs through the book, the granddaughter is overcome by a sense of alienation. She is familiar with happiness dictated from above, as propagandized in this book, from her school days in the GDR. Just 15 years after unification, however, she has long since been repulsed by it. This incident triggers a process of remembrance of her own family story over three generations.

Ulrike Heike Müller: „Überlass dein Glück nie den Chefkommentatoren“
© die tageszeitung, 17 March 2011

Peggy Mädler
Legende vom Glück des Menschen
Verlag Galiani Berlin, Berlin, 2011
ISBN 978-3-86971-032-7
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