Heinrich Steinfest

Wo die Löwen weinen

© Theiss  Verlag, Stuttgart, 2010 Heinrich Steinfest: Wo die Löwen weinen © Theiss Verlag, Stuttgart, 2010 Crime thrillers are a world power in the literary domain. There is no place, no living room where there is no groping in the dark, where no fears are overcome and where no crimes are exposed. The crime of murdering a city, for example. It is not in the penal code. So literature has to deal with it. And it adds the destruction of a deity to the destruction of a railway station, which the citizens are fighting tooth and claw. It might just be possible to get away with smashing the heart of Stuttgart into smithereens in the name of an infrastructure project, but it is not possible to get away with destroying a god, believes Heinrich Steinfest, the Austrian who has landed up in Stuttgart. And he buries a mighty artefact in the geologically unsurveyed land of the contested Stuttgart valley, an ancient dea ex machina that watches and waits there, absolutely refusing to be dislodged by the atavist Luddites of the Stuttgart 21 project. In judicial proceedings, that would be called reversal of the burden of proof. Here, in the depths, the rulers’ indolence and omnipotent self-assurance come up against such resistance that they fail.

Tobias Gohlis: „Die Göttin ist da und dagegen“
© Die ZEIT, 3 March 2011

Heinrich Steinfest
Wo die Löwen weinen
Theiss Verlag, Stuttgart, 2010
ISBN 978-3-8062-2423-8
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