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Karl Hepfer
Verschwörungstheorien.
Eine philosophische Kritik der Unvernunft

© Transcript Verlag, Bielefeld Karl Hepfer: Verschwörungstheorien. Eine philosophische Kritik der Unvernunft © Transcript Verlag, BielefeldDespite the fact that they make unreasonable cognitive demands, conspiracy theories have enjoyed growing popularity for some years. Without the triumph of the Internet, this upswing would have been impossible. While individual conspiracy theorists used to have to pay the price of broad social isolation, now, a considerable number of like-minded people for even the most abstruse beliefs are just a few clicks away. Hepfer is not satisfied with this explanation, however. In his view, belief in conspiracy theory explanations stems from the inability to face up to the genuinely modern insight that life has no significance that points beyond the act of living it.

Interpreted in this way, conspiracy theories are functional equivalents of religion. In Hepfer’s view, both conspiracy theories and religion satisfy exaggerated needs for orientation that are evidence of intellectual immaturity in that they arrange reality to form a meaningful whole that follows a predetermined plan.

Michael Pawlik: „Wer steckt dahinter“
© Die Welt, 6 February 2016

Karl Hepfer
Verschwörungstheorien. Eine philosophische Kritik der Unvernunft
Transcript Verlag, Bielefeld
ISBN 978-3-8376-3102-9
192 pages

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