Fairy tales work wonders
Simply worded, rich in imagery

  • One way in which to identify key scenes and concepts in fairy tales is to use picture cards. © Goethe-Institut/Jörg F. Müller
    One way in which to identify key scenes and concepts in fairy tales is to use picture cards.
  • Picture cards, with or without writing, and with German terms or text in two languages, can be used in a wide variety of ways and help the images in a language to be discovered © Goethe-Institut/Jörg F. Müller
    Picture cards, with or without writing, and with German terms or text in two languages, can be used in a wide variety of ways and help the images in a language to be discovered
  • Picture cards without text can be laid out in sequence to retell a story. © Goethe-Institut/Jörg F. Müller
    Picture cards without text can be laid out in sequence to retell a story.
  • Simple things like a paper bag can be used to make material for play – like a hand puppet for example. © Goethe-Institut/Jörg F. Müller
    Simple things like a paper bag can be used to make material for play – like a hand puppet for example.
  • Some participants discover that they have a talent for story-telling during the workshop. © Goethe-Institut/Jörg F. Müller
    Some participants discover that they have a talent for story-telling during the workshop.
  • Paper crowns are also easy to make: a prop that is virtually indispensable when it comes to narrating a fairy tale. © Goethe-Institut/Jörg F. Müller
    Paper crowns are also easy to make: a prop that is virtually indispensable when it comes to narrating a fairy tale.

Fairy tales and other stories handed down from generation to generation are common to all peoples and cultures. International repetitions and parallels can be identified for many of the motifs, which can be explained by shared traditions or reciprocal influences.

Well-known fairy tales like The Frog King, Mother Holle and the Town Musicians of Bremen are used as the basis for thinking together about how materials and symbols can be used in a playful and creative manner to find a common leitmotif that runs through the fairy tale in the native and the foreign language.

As a lector at the Büchereizentrale Schleswig-Holstein, Susanne Brandt has been responsible for the children’s literature department among other things since 2011. She is additionally involved in various projects aimed at encouraging reading. 

Presentation Susanne Brandt (Büchereizentrale Schleswig-Holstein)
 

Design of the material collection

The material in this collection has been put together to reflect the workshop topics. Pick the topic that interests you in order to obtain more information.

Words of welcome from Hella Klauser (Goethe-Institut) and lectures by Anne Barckow (Bücherhallen Hamburg) and Britta Schmedemann (Stadtbibliothek Bremen).

Introduction: Einfach lesen!
This workshop introduced participants to a variety of different techniques that involve using a combination of language and movement to better commit new words to memory and bring stories dynamically to life.

The workshop was run by Anika Schmidt, Stadtbibliothek Bremen, dbv Committee on Children’s and Young Adult Libraries.

Workshop: Bringing stories to life
Participants in this workshop were familiarized with the visual literacy concept, which provides access to text through pictures. Various methods of approaching specific themes were presented, for example using picture stories or memory games.
 
The workshop was run by Heidi Jakob, Bücherhallen Hamburg, children’s work coordinator.

Workshop: A picture’s worth a thousand words