Kritikmaschine
Heinz Bude

Populist moods

Today, Germany is a good case in point by which to study the emergence of a populist mood. In the course of the feared escalation of a refugee crisis, anti-elite aversions are combining into a mood of short-tempered irritability rooted in silent changes taking place in the structure of society. Those who have been “left out,” the “self-righteous” and the “embittered” who had long withdrawn into the spiral of silence, view themselves as victims of a successful reclamation of competitive power. The refugee crisis offers an opportunity structure for the opening of an outlet for those who have bitten their tongues for so long. Rhetorics of hate provide a possibility of feeling one’s own power and thereby of pulling an aggrieved, humiliated psyche back on its feet. The mood of systemic aversions struggles against the impression of a closed future that leaves one stuck in the state of a “broad present” (Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht).

Heinz Bude: Impressions from Prague and Seoul

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Margarita Kirilkina

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Margarita Kirilkina

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Margarita Kirilkina

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Margarita Kirilkina

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Margarita Kirilkina

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Margarita Kirilkina

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Margarita Kirilkina

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Goethe-Institut Korea/Guen-Young Lee

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Goethe-Institut Korea/Guen-Young Lee

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Goethe-Institut Korea/Guen-Young Lee

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Goethe-Institut Korea/Guen-Young Lee

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Goethe-Institut Korea/Guen-Young Lee

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Goethe-Institut Korea/Guen-Young Lee

  • Heinz Bude - Populist Moods © Goethe-Institut Korea/Guen-Young Lee

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