South-East Asia What remains

Nine journalists from South-East Asia took a look for themselves at refugee accommodation and aid projects, and heard political discussions and what refugees had to say.
© Goethe-Institut e.V.

In Berlin and Schwerin, nine journalists from South-East Asia took a look for themselves at refugee accommodation and aid projects, and heard political discussions and what refugees had to say. They report here on their impressions.

Germany’s refugee policy is a subject of interest to journalists around the world. Particularly in South-East Asia, there is great interest in finding out how Germany is dealing with its refugees, since there, too, some countries are having to manage a major refugee problem. Thus, nine journalists from countries as varied as China, the Philippines, Japan and Indonesia came to German at the invitation of the Federal Foreign Office to take part in a Visitors Programme tailored to their interests by the Goethe-Institut.
 

  • © Goethe-Institut e.V. Nisha Anders
    “At the Goethe-Institut, we consider it important not only to send our guests from one appointment to the next. We want to give them space and time to discuss their experiences with discussion partners and among themselves. Thus, an evaluation round at the end of each tour is useful. It gives us important feedback, enabling us to constantly improve our tour planning.”
    Nisha Anders facilitated the evaluation round and is Programme Coordinator at the Goethe-Institut.
  • What impressed visitors most © Goethe-Institut e.V.
    What impressed visitors most
    • Angela Merkel’s statement, which is something many refugees also say: We can do it!
    • Refugees’ individual stories, but also their fears
    • The openness and warmth with which many helpers welcome refugees
    • The Germans’ perseverance and hospitality
    • The many everyday heroes and community spirit – in the Philippines, this is called “bayanihan”
  • The suggestions and ideas taken home © Goethe-Institut e.V.
    The suggestions and ideas taken home
    • The insight that Germany acts partly out of a sense of historical responsibility
    • The will to help and the tangible humanity
    • The insight that human rights are not negotiable, unlike what is sometimes believed in Asia
    • The efficiency and energy with which many ordinary citizens pitch in to help
    • The many good experiences and new friends
  • Other things our guests want to tell us © Goethe-Institut e.V.
    Other things our guests want to tell us
    • To those who reject the government’s current refugee policies: respect them!
    • Keep it up! So the welcome culture and helpfulness do not diminish
    • Make improvements, especially regarding the registration process for asylum-seekers!
    • Communicate the problem of unemployment openly so that there is no resentment!