Literature and Journalism Rabea Edel

  • Rabea Edel © Goethe-Institut China
    Reading and dialogue with Rabea Edel at Goethe-Institit China
  • Rabea Edel © Goethe-Institut China
    Reading and dialogue with Rabea Edel at Goethe-Institit China
  • Rabea Edel © Goethe-Institut China
    Artist Talk by Rabea Edel at Red Gate Studio


The Goethe-Institut China launched its writer-in-residence programme Stadtschreiber in Peking in 2013. Berlin-based freelance author and journalist Rabea Edel was chosen for the residency in 2015.


Rabea Edel (b. 1982) studied Italian literature and culture  in Berlin, Siena and Rome. Her debut novel Das Wasser, in dem wir schlafen (“The Water We Sleep In”) came out in 2006, followed by another novel, Ein dunkler Moment (“A Dark Moment”), published by Luchterhand Literaturverlag in 2011. From 2011 to 2014 Rabea Edel was editor-in-chief of the German-English REVUE - Magazine for the Next Society. She is a co-founder of the Urban Journalism Salon, a journalism networking event  for participatory journalism, and has been a member of the PEN International writers’ association since 2014. She writes regularly for the press and works on projects at the interface between art, the creative industries and journalism.


During her two-month residency, Rabea Edel developed two of her own projects: a novella with the working title Stimmen und Gebiete (“Voices and Areas”) on the subjects of dictatorship, poetry, forced migration, and youth, and a book entitled Urban Journalism about current-day upheavals in journalism.


Edel gave a reading at the Goethe-Institut China on 22 November, presenting her works to date and her impressions of Beijing to the Chinese public.
And on 26 November 2015 she presented and discussed the idea of participatory journalism and the Urban Journalism Salon, screening videos of the latest salon on the theme of Heimat (“Home” or “Native Country”) and elucidating the concept: How can readers get involved in journalistic production ? How does “on-stage journalism” come about and why do we need an analog media salon of this kind in this age of digital journalism? How might a similar format look in China?