Creation Meeting

The Creation Workshop gave all 50 participants the chance to present the concepts developed in the respective research workshops and reflect on the experiences made. Afterwards, they collaboratively developed concrete ideas and concepts for an interactive, modular and sensory exhibition design. Maintaining a focus on interaction and direct experience, the workshop featured immersive spatial presentations from the participating architecture students as well as a visit to König Gallery and a talk with its founder Johann König, who became one of the world’s most influential gallerists despite his visual impairment.

A young woman wearing a black t-shirt and a silver-colored eye mask is coming towards the camera with her hands reaching out to explore the space around her. Her left hand rests on an inflated white plastic tube. Behind her two other girls move around in the same way in the room filled with similar inflated forms. Yet another one is taking pictures with her phone.
A group of people dancing in a room.A group of about 20 people are dancing in a wood-floored room with white walls. They all have their arms reaching over their heads, bended to their right hand side, hips to the left hand side. They form a more or less harmonious ensemble in their common movement.
Gallery interior with a blind woman wandering in it.In a high ceiling room with concrete walls and floor, groups of people stand dispersed in the wide space. Most of them are dressed in black and stand out in front of the pale grey walls. The wall on the left hand side however is covered with large colorful canvases. People look up at the high hanging contemporary art. In the foreground a visually impaired woman dressed in a black patterned dress is crossing the picture with a white cane in her hand.
A man and a woman are seen from behind; they are both seated on modern wooden chairs facing an audience of students sitting on white stairs. The man on the left, wearing a pale blue shirt and round glasses, is Johan König, owner and founder of the König Galerie in Berlin. The blonde woman sitting to his right is possibly interviewing him.

Hands touching fabric samples.The picture is a close-up of a ring binder containing fabric samples, whose surface appears to be extremely haptic and colorful. Two hands are exploring the texture’s roughness. Another person’s hands are visible in the background of the picture.

A young man in a dimly lit room is kneeling in front of a brown cardboard in the shape of a triangular roof. He is fixing the upper edge with cello tape. His silhouette is standing out on the lighter background of a room behind him.

After the kick-off event and the four research workshops, a final creation workshop takes place in Berlin. It is the last step before the final exhibition in Paris.

The Creation Workshop gives all 50 participants from the four involved countries the opportunity to present the concepts developed in the respective research workshops and reflect on the experiences made. Once again, the workshop takes place at ESMOD Berlin.

Intense brainstorming and choreography sessions lead participants to collaboratively develop concrete ideas and concepts for an interactive, modular and sensory exhibition design. How can the lived experience be made comprehensible and communicated to a wider public? How should the dresses emerging out of the workshops be presented and experienced.


Maintaining a focus on interaction and direct experience, architecture students of the University of Applied Sciences Wismar are also involved in the last creative stage. They submit innovative scenographic proposals and develop immersive spaces in which visitors lose all sense of orientation.

Inspirational input or the Berlin workshop comes from a visit to KÖNIG GALERIE and a talk with its founder, Johann König, who became one of the world’s most influential gallerists despite his visual impairment. After an accident at the age of 11 which cost him 98% of his eyesight, Johann König sharpened his other senses instead and convinced himself that the only thing for him to do was to work in artistic circles and open his own gallery. In 2002 this dream came true in the gallery’s premises located on Rosa-Luxemburg Platz, which were now moved to a former brutalist church on Dessauerstraße. KÖNIG GALERIE participates in international art fairs such as Art Basel, Frieze Art Fair, London, FIAC, Paris and Art Basel Miami Beach. The gallery has successfully placed works in a variety of private and public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Guggenheim Foundation.

I never really studied art theoretically. It was most of all intuition. I was always interested in conceptual art positions. Of course the question is, would I be that interested in content-based conceptual positions if I wouldn’t be visually impaired?”

How I see a painting? I see a JPEG on the Internet. Then I see a piece in real life, I see the surface. And then I see another image of the work from a professional photographer, and it puts together an image.” Johann König on how he encounters a photo

The garden of the König Gallery exhibits the work “Waterfall” by Italian artist Tatiana Trouve. Visually impaired Workshop participant Reiner Delgado appreciates the haptic properties of the bronze mattress-shaped fountain. The detailed casting reveals the wear, dimples, and indentations of the mattress, which seems to weep or perspire, revealing a humanlike quality to this intimate and forlorn object.

Most importantly, the Creation Workshop Berlin serves as an opportunity to strengthen the bonds that have been formed over the past months, encouraging new inclusive European networks of friendships and professional exchange.

Further Workshops