Seungwan Baek:
"Mixtum"

Seungwan Baek Seungwan Baek | Photo: Jihae Lee Seungwan Baek, born in 1981 in Seoul, South Korea, currently works as a freelance composer and conductor in Frankfurt am Main. He studied composition at Hanyang University (Seoul) and the University of Lübeck with Park Yeongkeun, E. Helmuth Flammer and Dieter Mack. He also attended a master class given by Hèctor Parra.

In 2005 he received an award in the competition for young composers of the Composers League-Korea and in the same year won another award in the Chamber Music section of the Seoul International Music Festival. In 2006 one of his works was performed as part of the Chosun Ilbo Concert for Young Composers, and in 2007 he won an award in the Orchestra section of the Seoul International Music Festival. Baek is also active in other areas of music and was musical and theatrical director of the experimental theatre performance Bar Code; music and sound director of the German-language performance of Dea Loher’s Leviathan; and music director of the German-Korean independent film Sudam.

He has also worked as a conductor with many ensembles and orchestra such as the IEMA (International Ensemble Modern Academy) and the Ensemble Analogue Translation. In 20134 he took part with the Ensemble Musikfabrik in a Reading Session as part of the workshop series "Composer Collider". In both 2013 and 2014 works by Baek were performed at the Blurred Edges Festival for Contemporary Music in Hamburg.

"Mixtum" for haegeum, oboe, clarinet (doubles as bass clarinet), bassoon, piano, violin, viola, cello and double bass

The “German Corner” in Koblenz The “German Corner” in Koblenz | Photo: Jihae Lee "The 'German Corner' in Koblenz inspired this piece. The place is so named because here the Rivers Rhine and Moselle meet. In my piece I bring this confluence to expression: two rivers encounter each other, each with its own speed and colour; they run parallel, gradually come together and become a single river. My musical source material is water, which on the one hand is the connecting element of the two rivers, but on the other hand also has opposed characters and colourings. These two aspects intermingle more and more in the course of the music and finally merge into each other."