Dresden – Tallinn What can art do as a language of freedom in an age of rampant resentment?

Over the past few years, it has become all too clear in Dresden that many residents see their glorified cultural homogeneity jeopardized when things change around them. In early 2017, at the opening of Monument, an installation by German-Syrian artist Manaf Halbouni, a right-wing mob rallied against artistic freedom and the policymakers who fund even provocative works of art. Can art in our day still show us a way to empathize with other people’s subjective experiences?

 


Dresden-Tallinn
The two partners, Kanuti Gildi SAAL art space in Tallinn and Kunsthaus Dresden, are working closely together. A multi-stage series of exhibitions and events began this past summer with the exhibition Freiheit zur Freiheit (“Freedom to Be Free”) in Dresden’s Kunsthaus (15 June–22 July 2018). The series is to be continued in both cities this autumn and winter.

The positions shown in Dresden last summer explore aspects of freedom in Socialism shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall, including works by Jaan Toomik, one of Estonia's most internationally renowned artists, and Marian Bogusz, whose work the Dresden-Tallin tandem discovered together during the December 2017 meeting in Warsaw. In September, Estonian artists in Dresden took a more contemporary look at freedom in the post-Socialist era. It was followed up by a sort of festival at Schloss Albrechtsberg near Dresden from 3–28 October, featuring a rich line-up of events and exhibitions expressly inviting a broad public to engage with the issue of freedom in Europe and to enter into direct contact with the work of the participating artists from Estonia and Germany at a popular and high-profile venue.

A mid-September weekend in Tallinn was devoted to artistic works on the subject of freedom, with performances, screenings and discussions. In January 2019, the activities of both cities are to merge in a Poliitpidu, a political party, in the run-up to the Estonian parliamentary elections. Artists will then discuss freedom and realms of freedom with politicians in Kanuti Gildi SAAL.

(September 2018)


Our Partner

Kunsthaus Dresden is a municipal gallery of contemporary art with a varied exhibition and educational program. One of its main goals is to make artistic forms of expression and content accessible to a wider public through its changing exhibitions.

Impressions from the series of joint exhibitions "Freedom to be free" in Dresden
 







  • View of the exhibition: Encouragements, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt ©Christa Jeitner / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018
  • View of the exhibition: Encouragements, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt ©Christa Jeitner / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018
  • View of the exhibition: Encouragements, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt ©Christa Jeitner / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018
  • View of the exhibition Jaan Toomik: Oleg, 20 min, 35 mm, 2010. Film still, Kunsthaus Dresden Photo David Brandt / Courtesy of the Artist and Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn
  • View of the exhibition Jaan Toomik: Oleg, 20 min, 35 mm, 2010. Film still, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt / Courtesy of the Artist and Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn
  • View of the exhibition Jaan Toomik: Waterfall 2005, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt / Courtesy of the Artist and Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn
  • View of the Exhibition Jaan Toomik: Oleg, 20 min, 35 mm, 2010. Film still, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt / Courtesy of the Artist and Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn
  • View of the exhibition Jaan Toomik: Selfportrait with cut-off penis (Homage to Van Gogh), 2015, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt / Courtesy of the Artist and Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn
  • View of the exhibition Jaan Toomik: Selfportrait with cut-off penis (Homage to Van Gogh), 2015, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt / Courtesy of the Artist and Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn
  • View of the exhibition Marian Bogusz: The Joy of New Constructions David Brandt
  • View of the exhibition Marian Bogusz: The Joy of New Constructions David Brandt
  • View of the exhibition Marian Bogusz: The Joy of New Constructions David Brandt
  • View of the exhibition Jaan Toomik: Selfportrait with cut-off penis (Homage to Van Gogh), 2015, Kunsthaus Dresden David Brandt / Courtesy of the Artist and Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn
  • View of the exhibition Marian Bogusz: The Joy of New Constructions David Brandt
  • View of the exhibition Marian Bogusz: The Joy of New Constructions David Brandt
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