Looking back None of my Business

  • Hannele Richert - None of my buisness Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hannele Richert - None of my buisness
  • Hannele Richert - None of my buisness Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hannele Richert - None of my buisness
  • Hannele Richert - None of my buisness Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hannele Richert - None of my buisness
  • Hannele Richert - None of my buisness Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hannele Richert - None of my buisness
  • Hannele Richert - None of my buisness Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hannele Richert - None of my buisness
  • Hannele Richert - None of my buisness Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hannele Richert - None of my buisness

 

Recently I came across two news articles that were somehow very similar.
The first one told historical facts about the great famine in Finland in 1867–1868. In the article a historian said that the officials were unwilling to give out food for free, but everyone, even the weakest, even children, had to work for their "living". So, of course a lot of people died at those worksites, too. This sounds incredibly cruel nowadays, but it resembles the popular ideology applied more and more in Finland (and in many other countries as well) today: work for your pay, or you don't deserve to live.
 
The other article told about the great famine in the Horn of Africa, happening right now. Many officials and organisations tried to get the international leaders to help prevent the crisis, but not enough was done. Also the Finnish Foreign Minister Timo Soini refused aid, in fact, he radically cut development aid altogether. The result is that more people are unable to live in the catastrophe areas: either they leave or they wither away. At the same time, paradoxically, the Foreign Minister preaches that refugees would best be helped in their own countries.  
 
I would very much like to see that actually happen.