Media Influence Fences

 

  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 1 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 2 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 3 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 4 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 5 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 6 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 7 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 8 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
  • Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences 9 Illustration: CC BY-NC-ND
    Hanneriina Moisseinen - Fences
According to Professor Jan-Werner Müller (2016), populism is not only anti-liberal, it is antidemocratic. When the populists are in power, they do not acknowledge that the existence of an opposition is justified. There is no longer any need for debates on values or questions related to society.

When the populists are not in power, it is said that they like to stigmatise their political oppositionists as corrupted elite. They consider themselves to be the “real folk”, who should have the power.
They want to unite the “real folk” – but include only those who think in the same way.

Besides the elite, Müller continues, the populists have a tradition of criticising people whom they do not see as the “real folk”. Modern populists deny being racists, but on the other hand their generalising rhetoric is addressed against ethnic or religious groups.

To me, it seems that the populists want more borders, more fences and exclusion, more separation into "us" and "them", “inside" and "outside". The graphic novel's first pictures show silhouettes of people who, seen through the text, could be Western politicians carrying their briefcases. As the pictures follow each other it turns out that they are refugees approaching a border. In the last pictures the perspective is from "our" side. At this point the stories also connect. Fences are being built both in the text as well as in the images.