German Orientalism

    About Fikrun

    Fikrun wa Fann was a cultural magazine published by the Goethe Institute from 1963 to 2016 that supported and shaped the cultural exchange between Germany and Islamic countries. Together with the publishing of the last issue, “Flight and Displacement” (issue 105), in autumn of 2016 the maintenance and updating of this online portal was ceased.
    Often, Oriental studies in Germany and Europe does not enjoy a particularly good reputation in the Islamic world, due to the stereotypes it uses, which can sometimes have a glorifying effect. This continues today to shape the West's attitude to the Orient, while modern Islamic science generates far more discriminating images.

    What is your opinion on this subject? Write to kulturzeitschriften@goethe.de!

    Owusu-Ankomah: Mouvement No.39, 2004. From the exhibition Africa Remix, Hayward Gallery, London. Reproduction from the catalogue.

    The Koran As Philological Quarry
    A Conversation with Christoph Luxenberg

    Christoph Luxenberg’s book The Syro-Aramaic Reading of the Koran triggered an extensive debate about the linguistic status and correct interpretation of the traditional text of the Koran. In this interview, the linguist explains his approach, his academic stance, and his intentions. He respects the Muslim tradition, but would like to discuss sections of the Koran that have to date been inadequately explained from a linguistic point of view.More ...
    Soly Cissé: Le monde perdu, 2003. Drawing No. VII. From the exhibition Africa Remix, Hayward Gallery, London. Reproduction from the catalogue

    Towards Trialogue: On the Future of Islamic Studies

    In this article, the well-known expert in Islamic studies makes a case for releasing Islamic Studies from the fashionable, yet restrictive corset that is ‘Regional Studies’, and to study Islam in a broader context alongside other monotheistic religions. This would not only lead to a better understanding of the respective cultures, but would also help reconcile them with one another.
    By Navid KermaniMore ...