morph* talks

morph*talks marks the starting point of the growing body of ideas coming together in the transcultural initiative Goethe Morph* Iceland: How we always wanted to have lived. Through conversations with and activations by artists, thinkers, and creators, morph*talks opens a discursive space to think collectively about a future morphology of living, embodied thinking, and the decolonization of knowledge. In the ongoing process the talks serve as a hybrid matrix that contextualizes and interconnects the various artistic and critical interventions belonging to Goethe Morph* Iceland. The morph*talks will take place in-person and online between April and September 2022.

A lonely country road in Iceland disappearing in the distance. Two stylized objects overgrown with moss seemingly floating across the road, in the front a moss ball, in the distance a polygon. © Goethe-Institut
Among the various artists and organizations taking part in morph*talks are Sigríður Þorgeirsdóttir and other members of Embodied Critical Thinking, Sabine Scho, Liz Rosenfeld, and Sóley Frostadóttir.
 

SOMEWHERE BETWEEN THE PAST AND THE FUTURE
Interview with Thomas Schaupp

Writer and choreographer Sóley Frostadottir in conversation with the co-curator of Goethe Morph* Iceland, Thomas Schaupp. 
White hand holding berries in front of moss floor © Goethe-Institut

 

TALKING CULTURE: HOW WE ALWAYS WANTED TO HAVE LIVED

Talking Culture #10 Isabel Raabe, Thomas Schaupp © Andreas Roth; Luca De Vitis Imagine life beyond crises. A world beyond catastrophe, wars and climate crisis. How would you like to live? And now think ahead to 2050. Looking back on your present self, how would you have wanted to have lived?

Isabel Raabe, curator and project developer of Talking Objects Lab,  and Goethe Morph* Iceland curator and dance dramaturg Thomas Schaupp joined our friends at Talking Cultures, a platform for thought-provoking discussions about the future of Europe, the UK, and the world by the Goethe-Institut London to talk about 
 

Or listen to Talking Culture: How we always wanted to have lived on Spotify or iTunes