German as a Language of Science – Creative Competition



Gefördert von:

© Ilja C. Hendel

The stated entry period has run off at midnight of the 16th of October, 2011

We are glad about the overpowering echo into which we have bumped with our competition. So many different ideas and proposals, sent from all over the world, book the big interest in the subject.
Our jury has now met, deliberated and selected its favourites from the numerous ideas submitted. The winners received their awards in Essen on 10 November 2011.

We thank now all participants warmly for their interest and their engagement.
 

Copyright:  L. C. Baratto, H. Walkenhorst u.a.
Fotostrecke: Plakate im Wettbewerb

Language generates knowledge.
Language transports knowledge.
Science and knowledge always involve language.

Languages, as the instruments of scientific and academic endeavour, offer access to worlds of knowledge, to publications, to teaching and research and to academic exchange with universities.

The results of the creative competition “German for Science”

Languages, as the instruments of scientific endeavour, offer access to worlds of knowledge, to publications, to teaching and research and to academic exchange with universities. While English may dominate in networks of interdisciplinary and international scholarly collaboration, the German language has traditionally enjoyed considerable importance in the history of science and scholarship.

But how best to illustrate and symbolize the relevance of the German language to science?

Close to 2,000 submissions from over 50 countries have demonstrated just how innovative, colourful and versatile German can be as a language of science. As well as drawings, sketches and slogans, we were sent audio files, poster series, essays and a great deal more besides. Participants from countries as diverse as Burkina Faso, Brazil, Russia, Malaysia, England, China, Egypt and Germany expressed their enthusiasm for German as a language of science and scholarship. We would like to thank everyone who took part – whether they are 6 years old or 82 – for their ideas!

The first prize goes to Johannes Hein (29) and Jennifer Bohn (27) from Weimar for their idea “Erste Worte” (i.e. First Words). Mr Hein and Ms Bohn will be presented with their prize of €3,000, donated by the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft, at the official opening of the “German in the Sciences” conference on 10 November 2011.

The jury selected 30-year-old Nico Liebe from Berlin for the second prize, while the third prize will go to 38-year-old Réka Bártfay from Budapest, Hungary.

Some of the most convincing suggestions have been elaborated by a graphic designer for worldwide implementation: in the form of a series of posters, the ideas will be used to advertise German as a language of science abroad. A number of the created artworks can be viewed here.

We invite you to admire the creative ideas – and are sure that they will present German as a language of science in an entirely new light!