William Forsythe

Heterotopia, Tänzerin: Yoko Ando  © Dominik Mentzos
'Black-Flags', © Dominik Mentzos
'Black-Flags', © Dominik Mentzos


William Forsythe's career as a choreographer spans over 45 years. His work is known for detaching the practice of ballet from its association with the classical repertoire and transforming it into a dynamic, 21st century art form. Forsythe's profound interest in basic principles of organisation has led him to realise a broad range of projects in the fields of installation, film, and internet-based knowledge development. Forsythe started his training with Nolan Dingman and Christa Long in Florida. He danced with the Joffrey Ballet and later the Stuttgart Ballet, becoming resident choreographer in 1976.

In the subsequent seven years he created new works for the Stuttgart ensemble and other ballet companies worldwide. In 1984 he started his 20-year tenure as director of Ballett Frankfurt. In 2004 Forsythe formed a new ensemble, The Forsythe Company, which he led from 2005 to 2015. Forsythe and his ensembles have received several awards; his performance, film and installation works are shown in many museums and exhibitions. Together with media specialists and educators, Forsythe has developed new, innovative approaches to dance documentation, research and studies.

He is currently Professor of Dance and artistic adviser at the choreographic institute of the University of Southern California, Glorya Kaufman School of Dance, as well as chorégraphe associé at the ballet of the Paris Opera.
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Portrait

Heterotopia, Tänzerin: Yoko Ando  © Dominik MentzosWilliam Forsythe, born in New York City, is considered an innovator within the practice of ballet and has influenced generations of dancers and choreographers. Forsythe has developed ground-breaking ballet choreographies, experimental dance pieces, digital dance scores and site-specfic installations, the Choreographic Objects. A typical characteristic of these works is the organisation of movement.

The visitors can move freely through the performative exhibition and thus become part of a choreographic arrangement. William Forsythe’s Choreographic Objects grant them access to novel situations, in which they themselves unexpectedly become actors through interaction with the installations. Line, movement, sound, compositional structures and aspects of performance in space play a key role in all of these works.
Mario Kramer

    Choreographic Objects since 2014

    Heterotopia, Tänzerin: Yoko Ando  © Dominik MentzosA Volume within which it is not possible for certain Classes of Action to arise (2015)

    Abstand (2015)

    Aufwand (2015)

    Instructions 2015 (2015)

    Nowhere and everywhere at the same time nr. 3 (2015)

    Birds, Bonn 1964 (2014)

    Black Flags (2014)