Remote Schools

Frau an einem Schreibtisch © Raycho Stanev

The project “Remote Schools” aims to connect interested schools in the Southeastern European region and, with the Goethe-Institute’s support, enable school boards as well as German teachers to try out models for goal-oriented and motivated German teaching in remote mode. The aim is to discuss the procedures and methods tested at pilot schools with education partners in a concluding symposium and to convert them into long-term local educational structures.

About the project

Zum Projekt wurde eine Dokumentation erstellt, in denen sich Teilnehmende aus drei Ländern zum Distanzlernen äußern.

Remote Schools © Goethe-Institut
  The Covid-19-crisis and the resulting closing of schools and home-schooling situation has met not only teachers and students with extraordinary challenges, but also the school administration and the ministries of education: How can standard classroom communication be transferred to a child’s room in their own home? How much “online”-behavior can and should you expect from students? How is educational content taught digitally and how can goals be reached in spite of a change in format? And most of all: How can I, as a teacher, motivate my students to learn (German) independently?
 
Successful socially distanced learning and teaching requires a functional interplay of organization, people, and technology: Schools and teachers must succeed in organizing and creating socially distanced learning; Students and parents need structures for lessons at home, and digital solutions are needed in order to make educational content and exercises available at home and to enable a socially distanced exchange. Even though the Covid-19-pandemic represents a temporary, exceptional situation: Concepts and materials for home-schooling, independent e-learning and digital forms of communication with students and parents will be of great importance for everyone involved, even after the crisis.

The project ”Remote Schools” aims to connect interested schools in the Southeastern European region and, with the Goethe-Institute’s support, enable school boards as well as German teachers to try out models for goal-oriented and motivated German teaching in remote mode. The aim is to discuss the procedures and methods tested at pilot schools with education partners in a concluding symposium and to convert them into long-term local educational structures.

Please download the German-English brochure on the project with interesting articles and interviews on the subject of distance learning!

Online conference

Program for teachers


Ein Mädchen hat Online-Unterricht © Getty Images
During the Covid-19-pandemic, teachers were required to move their previous lessons in physical presence to online meeting rooms within the shortest time. Many teachers have achieved considerable things in this time period, but looking back, the question arises which digital competencies a teacher needs in order to act confidently within the virtual teaching and learning space and to enable holistic online learning. In this module, participating German teachers will analyze their current digital competency based on the DigCompEdu (European frame for Digital Competency of Educators). The frame of reference will serve as both a base of communication and tool for establishing goals with the school administration and higher educational ministries. The areas of competency within DigCompEdu take a central role in this module. Participants develop strategies together in order to evolve their digital competencies in an area of their choice.

Schüler:innen beim Online-Unterricht © Getty Images
Methodical didactic knowledge of foreign language teaching is a central requirement for teachers’ successful lesson planning. This also applies to online classes. Nevertheless, teaching classes in a virtual space requires a different perspective in planning and, through the medium of online teaching, creates new formats of communication for teachers and students. Therefore, this module covers the balance and interweaving of synchronic and asynchronic learning in order to activate students in live online classes, develop strategies for collaborative learning, support learner’s autonomy and working with digital learning materials. Participants will view methodical didactic questions of teaching and learning in the virtual space, get to know tools and ideas for digital classes and develop their own phase of teaching to activate students.

Menschen sammeln Ideen zu einem Thema auf Klebezettel © Getty Images
As the term “socially distanced learning” suggests, this form of interaction does not automatically create a sense of closeness or trust among participants. A recurring topic at the moment is social isolation and loneliness as a result of home schooling. Teachers complain that students not turning their cameras on creates a lack of resonance. However, there are methods of creating closeness and establishing relationships even when distanced – both with students and their parents. In this module, participants will deal with the question: How is it possible to motivate students, break through the distance and be actively involved? Feedback methods and suitable channels of communication are also a part of this module.

Lehrer und Schüler während im Rahmen eines Online-Unterrichts mit einem Laptop. © Vanessa Garcia / Unsplash
Online classes and socially distanced learning require organizational and administrative capabilities and structures just as classes in physical presence do, only in a different way. How can performance be measured and exams be conducted online? How are parent-teacher consultations and communication with parents created online? Which technical equipment does a school need in order to establish successful socially distanced learning and how does this relate to data security? These are all new topics teachers and especially school administration must deal with. In this module, participants will exchange best practice examples and find new ways of integrating distanced learning into daily school life, of establishing reliable structures and further developing them through task forces at the school.

Zitat von Tanya Mihaylova (Englisch)

Program for school directors


Ein Mädchen hat Online-Unterricht © Getty Images
During the Covid-19-pandemic, teachers were required to move their previous lessons in physical presence to online meeting rooms within the shortest time. Many teachers have achieved considerable things in this time period, but looking back, the question arises which digital competencies a teacher needs in order to act confidently within the virtual teaching and learning space and to enable holistic online learning. In this module, participating German teachers will analyze their current digital competency based on the DigCompEdu (European frame for Digital Competency of Educators). The frame of reference will serve as both a base of communication and tool for establishing goals with the school administration and higher educational ministries. The areas of competency within DigCompEdu take a central role in this module. Participants develop strategies together in order to evolve their digital competencies in an area of their choice.

Lehrer und Schüler während im Rahmen eines Online-Unterrichts mit einem Laptop. © Vanessa Garcia / Unsplash
Online classes and socially distanced learning require organizational and administrative capabilities and structures just as classes in physical presence do, only in a different way. How can performance be measured and exams be conducted online? How are parent-teacher consultations and communication with parents created online? Which technical equipment does a school need in order to establish successful socially distanced learning and how does this relate to data security? These are all new topics teachers and especially school administration must deal with. In this module, participants will exchange best practice examples and find new ways of integrating distanced learning into daily school life, of establishing reliable structures and further developing them through task forces at the school.

Remote learning causes changes that affect the school development process. This process is institutional and includes areas of organizational development, human resource development, teaching development, cooperation development and technology development. But what has to change in the process of digitization and distance learning? What is behind terms such as “interdisciplinary planning groups”, “professional learning communities” or “resource-oriented coaching”? How can you create structures at school for project teaching and self-organized learning? In this module we will provide answers to these questions and discuss them together.

The digitalization of the learning and teaching world is representative of a general change in paradigms of school-related development: Schools are being requested to adapt to dynamics and changes in the (digital) world and simultaneously help mold it creatively. Schools are becoming mirror images of society, they move alongside it and within themselves. Analogue to this development, expectations of the role of schoolboard administration are also changing: Alongside a stabilizing leading and guiding function, they increasingly lend support to their schools in helping flexibilize processes which enable new (digital) approaches. In this workshop, we will deal with the challenges schoolboard administration faces in times of permanent change, as well as agile management in school administration. 
 

Referents






Anne Sass © Anne Sass

Anne Sass

“Just as in face-to-face courses, learners in digital learning formats need time and space to develop conducive relations: only when this works out well can learners handle the subject matter in a cooperative and interactive way. Especially in digital formats, building relations requires special attention from teachers:”





Interviews


Maria Melina Laina © Maria Melina Laina

Maria Melina Laina

Maria Melina Laina, MA, MEd, PhD Student at the University of Athens and Teacher of German at the Third Secondary School of Vyronas, Athens, Greece
 









Articles





Contact

Your contact person for all questions about the project:
Susanne Wunderlich, Goethe-Institut Bulgarien
remote-schools@goethe.de

Further information




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