German cuisine
Cooking with Annika !

Cooking with Annika! © Tobias Schrank, Photo: A. Wegerle

Surely you’ve heard about German cuisine classics such as Brezeln, Sauerkraut, Kartoffelsalat and Streuselkuchen… But have you ever cooked German recipes? If not, this is your chance! This winter, we are offering a series of online cooking workshops where you can discover a few delicious, comforting and easy recipes to make.

The Next Workshop


Pictures and recipes

Cooking is like music - love is the most imporant ingredient

Johanna Maier, celebrated Austrian chef

Rotkraut & Kartoffelknödel

There are many traditional Christmas meals in Germany (often influenced by different regions), among which you’ll find for example roasted goose, Rinderrouladen (braised beef rolls), Kartoffelsalat & Würstchen (potato salad & sausages), Sauerbraten (beef or pork roast marinated in vinegar) and many more. But there are certain elements that are present on many tables at Christmas: Rotkraut & Kartoffelknödel (braised red cabbage & potato dumplings). They’re classic side dishes for all kinds of roasts and braises - the spices in braised cabbage complement many kinds of meat and potato dumplings are the perfect vehicle for sauces and gravies. 

  • Rotkohl close © A. Wegerle/Aim Pé
    Rotkohl closeup
  • Rotkohl, Knödel, Roulade © A. Wegerle, Aim Pé
    Rotkohl, Knödel, Roulade from above
Download the recipe here (in French) :
 

Zimtsterne & Spritzgebäck

Plätzchen (“little cookies”) play a big part in Germany’s culinary Christmas traditions. They’re little cookies that the whole family bakes and enjoys together in big quantities during the holiday season. It’s the perfect opportunity to get together in the kitchen and enjoy some sweet treats. Among the all-time Plätzchen classics you’ll find Zimtsterne, Spritzgebäck, Elisenlebkuchen, Kokosmakronen, Vanillekipferl and Buttergebäck (to name just a few). 

  • Am Anfang war der Teig: Zimtsterne und Spritzgebäck © A. Wegerle
    In the beginning was the dough: cinnamon stars.
  • Spritzgebäck on its way to the oven. © A. Wegerle
    Spritzgebäck on its way to the oven.
  • Zimtsterne und Spritzgebäck © A. Wegerle
    All done: Zimtsterne and Spritzgebäck
During this first of two cooking workshops in December, our chef Annika will introduce you to the German Christmas tradition of Plätzchenbacken (“cookie baking”) by showing you how to make two kinds of classic Plätzchen: Zimtsterne (cinnamon stars) and Spritzgebäck (shortbread cookies).

Download the recipe here (in French) :
 

Käsespätzle

Spätzle are probably one of the most famous dishes of German cuisine. These irregularly shaped “noodles” (sometimes also described as dumplings) originated in the southern region of Swabia and are a traditional side dish to meats. However, they can very well hold their own as Käsespätzle: they get smothered in melted cheese and topped with crunchy Röstzwiebeln (caramelised onions) and fresh chives. 

During our November workshop, chef Annika showed how to prepare this iconic German dish.

Download the recipe here (in French):
  Spätzle © A. Wegerle

Asparagus

May is all about asparagus in Germany and you’ll find this wonderful vegetable (in Germany most often in its white version) prepared in all shapes and forms: as salads & soups, with potatoes and Sauce Hollandaise, roasted, and so on.
 
In this workshop, Annika combined elements from different traditional German recipes into one fresh spring dish: green asparagus, rolled savory pancakes with ham and green sauce.
 
Green sauce is originally from Frankfurt and is traditionally eaten cold with boiled potatoes and hard-boiled eggs. It gets its beautiful green colour from seven different kinds of fresh herbs.
 
The savory pancakes Annika will show us how to make are a typical side-dish for asparagus she grew up eating. They’re often rolled with ham, but can also be enjoyed plain.

  • Grüner Spargel © A. Wegerle
    Green asparagus, fresh from the farm
  • Grüner Spargel © A. Wegerle
    May is all about asparagus in Germany and you’ll find this wonderful vegetable (in Germany most often in its white version) prepared in all shapes and forms: as salads & soups, with potatoes and Sauce Hollandaise, roasted, and so on.
  • Grüner Spargel © A. Wegerle
    The savory pancakes are a typical side-dish for asparagus she grew up eating. They’re often rolled with ham, but can also be enjoyed plain.
Download the recipe here (in French):

Maultaschen

In this workshop, chef Annika showed us how to make an absolute classic of Swabian cuisine: Maultaschen. These traditional rectangular “German dumplings” consist of freshly made pasta dough and a filling whose main components are ground meat and spinach. 
 
For those of you who don’t eat meat, we also provide a vegetarian, yet slightly less traditional recipe. 

  • The beginning of the Maultaschen © Annika Wegerle
    The beginning of the Maultaschen
  • The beginning of the Maultaschen © Annika Wegerle
    Also important: Flour and egg.
  • The beginning of the Maultaschen © Annika Wegerle
    And more flour and egg.
  • The beginning of the Maultaschen © Annika Wegerle
    And they're done: Maultaschen (in a bowl)
  • The beginning of the Maultaschen © Annika Wegerle
    ..and on a plate.
Download the recipes here:

Mohnstreuselkuchen

 

  • Auf dem Blech © A. Wegerle
    Poppy seed crumble cake on the tray
  • Zutaten zum Mohnstreuselkuchen © A. Wegerle
    Ingredients for the Mohnstreuselkuchen
  • Zutaten zum Mohnstreuselkuchen © A. Wegerle
    The most important ingredient for the Mohnstreuselkuchen
  • On a plate © A. Wegerle
    Poppy seed crumble cake on a plate
Download the recipe here:

Flammkuchen

 

  • Zutaten #1 © A. Wegerle
    A handful of ingredients
  • Zutaten #1 © A. Wegerle
    The dough (ideally)
  • Resultat #1 © A. Wegerle
    Vegetarian Flammkuchen
  • Resultat #2 © A. Wegerle
    Flammkuchen with Speck
Download the recipe here:

Potato salad


Download the recipe here:

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