Quick access:
Go directly to content (Alt 1)Go directly to second-level navigation (Alt 3)Go directly to first-level navigation (Alt 2)

Graffiti Removal
Subconscious Art

Graffiti buffed with light green colorfields behind a redwood fence
The subconscious art of graffiti removal | Photo: © Lord Jim

Graffiti removal has subverted the common obstacles blocking creative expression and become one of the more intriguing and important art movements of our time. Emerging from the human psyche and showing characteristics of abstract expressionism, minimalism and Russian constructivism, graffiti removal has secured its place in the history of modern art while being created by artists who are unconscious of their artistic achievements.
Press Release for “The Subconscious Art of Graffiti Removal” (film) by Matt McCormick, 2001

By Avalon Kalin

Graffiti Removal: The act of removing unwanted graffiti by painting over it, or otherwise making it unreadable.
Subconscious Art: A work of art that is made without the direct intention of its creator.
 
A new art movement has emerged in the modern era and can be found in nearly every city across the globe. Graffiti removal, commonly called “buffing”, fills otherwise empty walls with large and small minimalist paintings, in a multi-layered and often textural style. Mostly ignored until now, graffiti removal is gaining attention daily.

Social media allows enthusiasts to gather and share their photographs from around the world and documentaries are being made exploring this new artistic production. These highlight the stark and sublime relief within the urban landscape that these works offer the viewer. However, it remains the myserious origins of the new movement which continue to charm the everyday passersby and urban adventurers alike and invite further research for the serious art historian. 
 

Our most advanced, sensuous, and subtle visual culture must be communicated to itself subconsciously, clandestinely, so that it can be enjoyed as a kind of “public secret.”

Avalon Kalin, interviewed in “BUFF” by Stephan Burke and Fiachra Corcoran 2018



Often a collaboration between individual graffiti artists and graffiti removers that spans weeks and even months to create a single large scale mural, graffiti removal can be seen to be collaborative and has overlap with both social practice and time-based genres. The overall style of buffing is distinct and has obvious and elemental links to minimalism and abstract expressionism, affinities with the likes of Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, and Ellsworth Kelly, as well as connections to early modernist experiments of the Bauhaus and the anti-art of Dada.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Ein konservativer Buff mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben erzeugt ein neues Bild. © Lord Jim
    Ein konservativer Buff mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben erzeugt ein neues Bild.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Ein konservativer Buff mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben lässt unvorsätzlich ein minimalistischers Gemälde entstehen. © Lord Jim
    Ein konservativer Buff mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben lässt unvorsätzlich ein minimalistisches Gemälde entstehen.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Eilige Kritzeleien um einen Tag zu überdecken: ein Beispiel für eine redigierte Graffiti-Entfernung. © Avalon Kalin
    Eilige Kritzeleien um einen Tag zu überdecken: ein Beispiel für eine redigierte Graffiti-Entfernung.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Schichten schablonierter Buffs - das moderne Palimpsest der Stadt. © Avalon Kalin
    Schichten schablonierter Buffs – das moderne Palimpsest der Stadt.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: kein Buff, sondern ein Detail eines Gemäldes ohne Titel, 1953, von Mark Rothko. Originale Rothko-Gemälde kann man nicht in den Straßen finden. Foto © G. Starke / Künstler: Mark Rothko
    Kein Buff, sondern ein Detail eines Gemäldes ohne Titel, 1953, von Mark Rothko. Originale Rothko-Gemälde kann man nicht in den Straßen finden.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Kein Rothko-Gemälde, sondern ein einfacher Buff – kann man nicht in Museen oder Privatsammlungen finden. © Lord Jim
    Kein Rothko-Gemälde, sondern ein einfacher Buff – kann man nicht in Museen oder Privatsammlungen finden.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Ein konservativer Buff mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben lässt unvorsätzlich ein minimalistisches Gemälde entstehen. © Avalon Kalin
    Ein konservativer Buff mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben lässt unvorsätzlich ein minimalistisches Gemälde entstehen.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Mehrere konservative Buffs mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben erzeugen ein neues minimalistisches Bild. © Lord Jim
    Mehrere konservative Buffs mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben erzeugen ein neues minimalistisches Bild.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: „Lyre Bird“, ein abstraktes Gemälde von Franz Kline aus dem Jahr 1957 weist Ähnlichkeiten mit einem Buff auf, der auf den Straßen zu finden ist. Foto ©rocor via Flickr / Künstler: Franz Kline
    „Lyre Bird“, ein abstraktes Gemälde von Franz Kline aus dem Jahr 1957 weist Ähnlichkeiten mit einem Buff auf, der auf den Straßen zu finden ist.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: „Lyre Bird“, ein abstraktes Gemälde von Franz Kline aus dem Jahr 1957 weist Ähnlichkeiten mit einem Buff auf, der auf den Straßen zu finden ist. © Lord Jim
    Angestellte der Stadt beim Überstreichen von Graffiti, ohne jedes Bewusstsein für ihre Rolle als Künstler und ihren Beitrag zum Diskurs über öffentliche und private Instrumentalisierung und Ästhetik.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Buff-Spott: eine sarkastische und zugleich lustige Wand von AO (Nischni Nowgorod, Russland) Foto ©Flickr User: vr_ Künstler: AO
    Buff-Spott: eine sarkastische und zugleich lustige Wand von AO (Nischni Nowgorod, Russland)
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Eine Reihe konservativer Buffs mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben führt unweigerlich zu einer neuen Anomalie im Stadtbild © Avalon Kalin
    Eine Reihe konservativer Buffs mit nicht übereinstimmenden Farben führt unweigerlich zu einer neuen Anomalie im Stadtbild
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Ein schabloniert übermalter „ghosted“-Tag (Tag = grafisch gestaltete Graffiti-Signatur). © Avalon Kalin
    Ein schabloniert übermalter „ghosted“-Tag (Tag = grafisch gestaltete Graffiti-Signatur).
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Weder Graffiti noch ein Buff, sondern das Gemälde „Mahoning“ von Franz Kline aus dem Jahr 1956. Gemälde von Kline sind nur in Museen oder Privatsammlungen zu finden, nicht in den Straßen. Foto ©G. Starke via Flickr / Artist: Franz Kline
    Weder Graffiti noch ein Buff, sondern das Gemälde „Mahoning“ von Franz Kline aus dem Jahr 1956. Gemälde von Kline sind nur in Museen oder Privatsammlungen zu finden, nicht in den Straßen.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Eine radikal schablonierte Übermalung eines Tags. © Lord Jim
    Eine radikal schablonierte Übermalung eines Tags.
  • Street-Art-Kommentar „Man kann Armut nicht übermalen“ von Murmure, Paris 2017 Foto: © Ferdinand Feys via Flickr, Künstler: Murmure
    Street-Art-Kommentar „Man kann Armut nicht übermalen“ von Murmure, Paris 2017
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Ein konservativer Buff, der an ein abstraktes expressionistisches Gemälde erinnert. © Lord Jim
    Ein konservativer Buff, der an ein abstraktes expressionistisches Gemälde erinnert.
  • Die unbewusste Kunst der Graffiti-Entfernung: Street-Art „Art Buff“ von Banksy in Folkestone, Kent, 2014. Der Titel des Werks „ART BUFF“ ist ein spöttisches Wortspiel: „Art Buff“ ist der Kunstliebhaber und „Buff“ ist ein Slang für das Übermalen von Graffiti. © Helmut Zozmann via Flickr
    Street-Art „Art Buff“ von Banksy in Folkestone, Kent, 2014. Der Titel des Werks „ART BUFF“ ist ein spöttisches Wortspiel: „Art Buff“ ist der Kunstliebhaber und „Buff“ ist ein Slang für das Übermalen von Graffiti.

GRAFFIti removal can be seen to fit into three main categories: Conservative, Ghosting, and Radical

 
Conservative
This is the standard and most common form of graffiti masking. It is the result of the primary purpose of masking to destroy the readability of graffiti without being an eyesore in itself. Neutral hues like dark grey in more or less rectangular shapes define this category.
 
Ghosting
Ghosting is the graffiti removal that is probably the result of haste or lack of resources, because it is the least effective form of graffiti removal. In this type of removal, the original “tag” is followed, or “ghosted” by the buff artist, This often results in the original piece being visible in shape or outline, making for wild compositions. This is the most obviously collaborative category of removal.

Radical
This masking usually covers all of the graffiti but does so in a radical way. This category is distinguished usually by the buffing artist painting new shapes, usually silhouettes, that are recognizable as drawings of objects (like a truck with wheels, or whale with blowhole and tail). The removal process is radically transformed into an opportunity to share primitive symbols or pictures. This category is always fun to find, but rare to occur.
 
Specific new categories explored by documentarians and collectors include Redactive (proposed by McCormick), Non-Removal and Reactionary (Kalin), Maltreated and Etched (Burke and Corcoran) and are explained below.
 
“Redactive” graffiti removal involves strong and simple hatches, dashes or “X”s to render graffiti unreadable but partially visible. “Non-removals” are forms of subconscious art created by processes in building construction, like crack priming of concrete walls, or color sampling on areas of walls of buildings. “Reactionary” buffing appears to be made by graffiti artists who want to expand the graffiti removal area by adding faux-removal areas. “Maltreated” graffiti removal appears as highly distressed mark-making or “scribbling out” with a hodgepodge use of materials made in haste. “Etched” graffiti removal specifically addresses the textures created by the use of sandblasters and water pressure to change the surfaces where the removal occurs creating long term painterly compositions.
16mm/Digital video – 16 minutes – 2002 Narrator: Miranda July Director, writer, cinematographer, editor, sound design: Matt McCormick Original ideas: Avalon Kalin more info at rodeofilmco.com
As our society continues its trend of consumerism and alienating work environs, our natural tendency to create becomes repressed. We unconsciously look for new ways to express our innermost desires and to share these expressions with others. Every tinkering or revision of what surrounds us produces some kind of artifact of this clandestine expression – this subliminal and subconscious art. Though like Minimalist Art of the 1970s, Subconscious Art is just as much about what surrounds it as it is in the form itself, Graffiti Removal nonetheless must be credited to the artists who produce it.
 
While the artistic merit of graffiti removals and the question of intention in aesthetic work may be up for debate, the continued interest in, and artistic aspects of, graffiti removal cannot be ignored. The categorization of the work and documentation of the movement is on the rise. Art historians, cultural leaders, and street photographers continue to celebrate this unique movement in the form of video, photographs and books. The provocative idea that art is everywhere and being created subconsciously has a distinct charm, and the subconscious art of graffiti removal continues to blur the line between art and life in new and meaningful ways.

Top